Ting Statement on the Governor’s May Revise

Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), Chair of the Assembly Budget Committee, released the following statement about the Governor’s May Revision for the 2021-22 state budget:

“California is in a unique position. We need to think big! Not only can we keep helping Californians who are still struggling, but there’s also an opportunity to build a foundation for the next century. I’m eager to invest in priorities like infrastructure, university expansion, affordable housing supply and climate resilience – all of which will keep the state strong for generations.

To help us get there, we must first address the challenges of today. We need to stabilize working families by getting them back to work and school, while also ensuring they have a roof over their heads. We’ve already taken early budget action that sent stimulus checks to individuals and small businesses, ramped up wildfire protection and extended eviction safeguards. We can now do so much more. The Assembly Budget Blueprint unveiled last month outlines a vision that includes providing additional cash assistance, reversing budget cuts made last year, expanding critical support services, and stimulating the economy. This roadmap allows our state to emerge from the pandemic better than ever.

The Governor’s May Revise explores similar ambitions, and I look forward to spending the next month working with legislators and the Governor to deliver a balanced, on-time budget by the June 15th deadline.”

To view budget comments Assemblymember Ting made on May 10th, prior to May Revise, please watch here.

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CA Bill Could Bring Freedom To Cross The Street Without Fear Of Criminalization For “Jaywalking”

Publication: Witness LA

Black Californians are up to 4.5 times more likely to be stopped for jaywalking than their white peers, according to data the state collects under the Racial and Identity Profiling Act (RIPA). The Freedom to Walk Act, a bill introduced by Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) and pedestrian safety groups, aims to address this disparity by decriminalizing walking in the street outside of a legal intersection.

Ting & API Legislative Caucus Unveil $200M Budget Proposal To Address AAPI Hate

API Budget

Proposal to Address Hate Crimes in the AAPI Community
The California Asian Pacific Islander population has faced increased attacks against members of their community since the COVID-19 pandemic began more than one year ago. Racist rhetoric coming from the previous White House has mobilized and emboldened individuals who wish to sow hate against AAPIs by attacking them. California must take a strong stance against this violence and provide community support, services, prevention against these attacks, and cultural and economic development for the community. This proposal requests $200 million over a three-year period to address hate crimes against the AAPI community. (Click headline to see entire list.)

Direct Response – $159.5 million

  • Victims Services & Prevention – $109.5 million

Nonprofit or CBOs that are providing necessary services to victims of hate crimes, such as legal services, health care, mental health, victim’s compensation, or counseling will receive grant funding so that these services may be provided free of charge. Grantees that are service providers should be within the database that the hotline provides referrals to.

Nonprofits or CBOs providing services to protect and prevent attacks against API individuals (such as senior escort programs) will also receive grants to continue this work. Nonprofits or CBOs that provide educational or healing programs about the historic harms caused by structural and systemic racism across different communities of color will receive grants to continue or start this work.

Statewide Hate Crimes Hotline – $10 million

California lacks a single location for individuals to report hate crimes and incidents that can also connect callers with necessary services. This proposal seeks to provide a hotline run by a nonprofit entity that serves as a centralized hub that would connect caller’s in-language to the appropriate local resources, whether they be legal, health care, mental health, or law enforcement if they choose to report. The hotline will also collect data on these calls about the hate crimes and incidents occurring, which will be reported to the Legislature on July 1, 2024. This program may be eligible for federal funding.

Culture and Economic Development – $20 million
Hate rhetoric and the COVID-19 pandemic has caused rippling economic effects to ethnic hubs across the state. In order to rebuild these communities and recognize the important cultural role they provide to California, the state shall provide grants to local ethnic hubs to revitalize Chinatowns, Japantowns, Koreatowns, Little Manilas, etc. Local nonprofits or CBOs would receive grant funding to beautify ethnic corridors, create cultural monuments, revitalize community centers, notify local business owners about existing grant programs to assist small businesses, and provide direct assistance to businesses if necessary.

San Jose Man’s Redemption Held Up As Testament To Landmark Prison-Reform Law

Publication: San Jose Mercury

About two years into what was slated to be a 28-year prison sentence, Kennard Isaiah Love was all out of hope.

... “I decided I was going to make so much of a positive influence in prison, they’re going to kick me out of there,” Love said.

With the help of a two-year-old law, he did just that.

Use of Gun Violence Restraining Orders Continues To Rise

Publication: San Francisco Examiner

For the fourth year in a row, the number of gun violence restraining orders issued in California has grown, as California residents and law agencies increasingly make use of the state’s “red flag” law.

Gun violence restraining orders, or GVROs, mandate the temporary removal of a person’s firearms because they pose a danger to themselves or others.

2020 Totals Show Use of California’s Red Flag Law Continues to Rise Despite Pandemic

For the fourth consecutive year, more Californians and law enforcement agencies have turned to the courts to prevent senseless shootings. Judges approved 1,285 gun violence restraining orders (GVROs) last year, mandating the temporary removal of an individual’s firearms because they pose a danger to themselves or others. That brings the total number of GVROs issued in California to 3,008 since the red flag law began in 2016.

“The closure of our courts for periods of time during the pandemic may have contributed to the slow growth in GVRO usage. Still, nearly 1,300 orders were issued, with San Diego County leading the way. I’m glad that Californians have a tool to intervene to save lives and prevent tragedies,” said Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), the author of AB 61, which took effect September 1, 2020. The bill expanded the pool of people who can ask for a GVRO, allowing educators, employers and co-workers to file for one when coordinating with school administrators or human resources departments. Prior to Ting’s law, only family members and law enforcement could obtain a GVRO by going to the courts directly.

In California, there are two ways GVROs can be granted:

  • For a duration of 21 days, immediately (which can be extended to one year with a court hearing); or,
  • For a duration of up to five years, after a court hearing


Restraining OrderThe release of gun violence data is later than usual this year because the California Attorney General’s (AG) Office began withholding firearms records. This also made it difficult for researchers to continue studying the effectiveness of the state’s gun policies. But the newly sworn-in Attorney General Rob Bonta made the vital information available as soon as he took office. However, to ensure state data regarding firearms remain accessible for years, Ting will continue to pursue AB 1237 this session - his bill reiterating the duty of the AG’s Office to release these materials to California research centers.

“We’re very glad to have received the information we need to continue our detailed evaluation of California’s pioneering GVRO policy. Research on many other violence prevention policies and programs also depends on data from the Department of Justice; we and our colleagues at other universities are hopeful that the legislature will act to preserve that access, for the sake of all Californians,” said Garen Wintemute, Director of the Violence Prevention Research Program at U.C. Davis Health.

AB 1237 is currently in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.